propecia pregnancy

Archive for January, 1990

An Economic Plan for Sindh

The growing polarisation between the populations of the major urban centres in Sindh compounded by the deteriorating law and order situation calls for drastic changes in conceptual planning for economic emancipation. This is the PM’s main electoral base, escalation in the level of violence will not be conducive to either economic progress or democratic rule. She has to take firm steps to contain the law and order situation from becoming worse, the government must look at economic means for long-term solutions for the Province as a whole.

Share

Economic Exploitation of the Coastal Areas – II

At Gwadar, a Belgian company is engaged in the construction of a Fish Harbour for US$ 45 million provided mostly under Belgian Grant/Soft Aid. A telephone and telegraph facility based on DOMSAT satellite has recently been inaugurated. The fish catch in the area will justify the size of the facilities, the harbour when constructed can also easily accommodate naval vessels, more importantly it can be easily expanded to cater for larger vessels. The works parameters may be expanded so that benefit is derived from present construction mobilisation. Placed just outside the Gulf, Gwadar has strategic importance, it is a natural staging port for the Gulf in case war between Iran and Iraq should ever break out again, a distinct possibility. Supertankers may not be able to go into the Gulf this time with Iranians better equipped to interdict them with naval forces.

Share

Geo-political analysis – Pakistan’s emerging role

Given our domestic pre-occupations since Independence, it is not surprising that we lack a clear annunciation of our strategic role in this region and the world. Our foreign policy has never really been independent, though at times we may have been cast as a maverick to the ensuing world order (notably our early deep friendship with the People’s Republic of China). We are not a poor country, we have been turned into one. As a nation we were blessed with rich resources, in material and skilled manpower. We wasted the first decade in internecine quarrels that led us to the first Martial Law which in turn laid the seeds for the Second Martial Law resulting in disintegration in 1971 into two sovereign independent nations of Pakistan and Bangladesh. While pre-1971 we identified ourselves with South East Asia, belatedly we turned to the Middle East, by then the chance of leadership in the region had been taken over by Iran on the strength of its oil revenues. Oil riches has also transformed the other countries of the Middle East to the extent that our skilled and unskilled manpower have just become another cog in the vast number of expatriates from other countries.

Share

Economic Exploitation of the Coastal Areas – 1

Since independence, Pakistan has been dependant upon only one Sea-port, Karachi, for its maritime communications. Most of the industries came up in Karachi because of the port or in the vicinity. From little more than a sleepy fishing village at the beginning of the century (population 100,000) to a population of about half a million in 1947 rising to the present level of 9 million, the city of Karachi has outgrown all possible permutations and combinations of socio-economic infrastructure and facilities, causing tremendous social and economic strain on the city’s masses. While over-population has been bad enough, the amalgam of various ethnic groups drawn to the city either as refugees from India or in search of employment from up-country has created social unrest, the various groups competing for economic dominance. This has been further exacerbated by different waves of refugees from Burma, Iran (pro- and anti-Shah), Afghan Refugees and a large influx of Bangladeshis as domestic help (and now, industrial labour).

Share

On the road to conflict?

The war of words with India looks like escalating into an armed conflict, almost the only issue is when? In the circumstances it becomes incumbent to examine the situation dispassionately, study all our options and take certain positive actions in the time available to us. This is not to say anybody in his right mind would welcome war, experience with India has taught us that war will be thrust upon us whether we like it or not.

Share

Year of the Economy

The past year has seen a pragmatic approach to the handling of the economy by the PPP Government, it has succeeded in at least slowing our abysmal slide towards economic apocalypse. Ms Bhutto was voted into power by a mixture of positive and negative support generated by her undeniable charisma, enduring adulation for her late father, widespread resentment against the years of martial law and the economic aspirations of the people fed on populist slogans. However, early on in her administration she modulated the known stance of the PPP manifesto and resorted to judicious airing of populist slogans for mass audiences only. To select audiences mainly entrepreneurs petrified at the memories of the earlier PPP regime’s penchant to nationalise everything in sight, she made known her rightward shift in ideological preferences, sweet manna from heaven for entrepreneurial ears, a shot in the arm for private enterprise.

Share

The Year in Retrospect

Prime Minister Ms Benazir Bhutto has recently held marathon sessions with her ministerial colleagues reviewing the performance of each ministry in some detail. This is a welcome exercise and if she can take incisive action, cutting through the smokescreen that the bureaucrats are capable of manipulating to cover their misdeeds and shortcomings, sometime making their nominal masters, the various ministers unwitting collaborators, we are going to have measure of accountability, performance-oriented maybe but a start nevertheless.

Share